Peeling off the sides and bringing down the walls!

The inside of the camper walls was framed out with wooden studs. We used a pry bar and sledgehammer to remove these so we could get the aluminum frame and siding removed.

It was easiest to start at one end and lightly hammer the ends away from the metal ribbing running around the seams of the camper. Once we got that separated then we were able to peel and hammer it open like a tin can!

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It was so exciting to see out the side!

As we worked our way around the camper we removed the windows and the door and would set them to the side. We found that the weight of them was almost to heavy for just the shell to hold up once we removed the wooden studs and they began to pull the sides down!

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Eventually we had one entire side off and then needed a plan for the rest of it. Originally we had planned to take off both sides and leave the ends and roof till last but that became apparent it would work. There was just no way the ends would support the roof by themselves.

We decided we’d take the ends off and try to collapse the final wall to the right. As soon as we removed one end the whole thing began to lean!

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We relized it was no longer safe to work inside it even with additional supports and since safety comes first we took the demo outside to continue.

As so as the second end was removed the whole thing was easy to push over. It landed in a heap with the roof coming to rest on top of and beside the trailer.

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Next step? Breaking it all down into managable pieces of aluminum so we could stack it in a heap.With in a few days time we went from a shell to a floor covered trailer! One step closer to the dream!

Dreaming into Reality!
~Angie

Stripping the inside! (Walls, ceiling and insulation)

Our next step has been to remove the ceiling, walls, and insulation.

First we pulled down the ceiling panles. They were a thin sheeting of wood with printed “wood” wallpaper over the top. This should have been easy to remove after popping the small finishing nails away from the studs. But it wasn’t. The panles were glued to the rigid foam board insulation. Some of the glue had weakened with time but much of it still held fast.

After some time trying to separate each panel from the foam we decided it would be easier to just pull down the sheeting and foam all at the same time. It took a bit of work but we got a system down.

Next was on to the walls. They had a similar practical board wood panel but this time they were just painted white. This compromised their integrity more  and made them easier to break apart.

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Once the ceiling was completely removed and a few of the studs as well there wasn’t really anything holding the metal roof up other than what was left of the sides. It wasn’t to bad of a problem till it started to rain! Then the sagging roof created a pool for water to collect in. We decided the best way to deal with it was propping the middle up circus tent style.

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The whole thing was quite a process of peeling, prying and pulling. The only thing left when we completed all this was an aluminum shell with the framework of studs holding up the walls and roof.

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But now its done! We are one step closer to the construction point!

Dreaming into Reality!
~Angie

Bathroom work

One of the big draws for me when getting this camper was seeing a bathtub in the bathroom!

I KNOW we want one in our tiny house, (single mother and toddler aren’t forfeiting our bathtub) seeing this one made me believe all the more that it’s possible. Most tiny houses have a shower in the bathroom but not many have a bathtub. Ours will for sure!!! 🙂

Today we decided to pause for a few moments and try this one out before the demolition of the bathroom.

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Then it was time to get back to work.
And work it was! Since we wanted to preserve the sink, tub and toilet for possible reuse or resale later we had to be careful in the process and not just go banging with a sledgehammer.  (Lots of fun if you’ve never tired it!)

We tried to but realized we needed a new tactic then a crowbar and sledgehammer if we wanted to keep things in usuable condition.

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So first we had to remove lots screws.
LOTS and LOTS of them.

All around the tub face…..
And across the bottom of the tub…..
And under the sink…..
Around the mirror……..
And around the toilet…..
(ok those were more like bolts but still needed turning)

That part (the screw removal) took longer then the demolition of everything after those were finally out.

The pipes were a great flexible tubing and offered lots of information and ideas for the Tiny House plumbing considerations.

We even found a surprise left by the orginal builders, we guess anyway. Under the bathtub,
In a pile of termite debris  (yuck those guys had fun with the walls and foam board insulation) we found an old flashlight in brand-new condition! It didn’t even have batteries in it.

My little guy was quite excited about this new treasure!

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After removing the bathtub out came the sink and then the toilet.

There was a storage cabinet that had the hot water heater housed in the bottom and we decided to leave that were it was for now.

So when we were finally done we had an almost gutted camper! At least on one end 🙂

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Dreaming into Reality!
~Angie

Demolition!!!

Next up…. those cabinets need to go!

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Its been a week of work! Got some preliminary things done like pulling out all the appliances, lighting fixtures and a few small after market shelves and things added by a previous owner.

Removed the sink, fixtures and disconnected the plumbing lines.

(Thank you to my father for his help)

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Then it was time to get down to demo business. The counters and cabinets needed to go!

We removed the cabinitdoors and drawers to consider reusing later, and enjoying for fun currently.

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(My ever present son and helper Johnathan, and my wonderful mother were assisting this day)

Last to go in this stage was the entry door, and walls to the bathroom. So down they came!

Lots of sweat and tears later, (ok so no real tears yet unless you count my poor little guy being worried THIS was his tiny house and here we were tearing it apart) we had an empty space where they once stood!

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Dreaming into Reality!
~Angie

Reclaiming

Why add to the landfill when we can reuse something and give it a new life? Reduce, Reuse, Recycle!

There are many things in this old camper that we plan to give a place and purpose in our Tiny house! Its exciting to see the prospects all around us.

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The stove is an older Tappan brand, it runs off propane, is small and in pretty good condition. Its perfect for off grid living in our Tiny House on Wheels!

We also know there is a large freshwater holing tank we are excited to reclaim for rainwater collection.

We might be able to reuse the water pump as well. We know it runs on 12v DC power and thik it was replaced at some point. It might or might not be the original but working well at this point so we shall see.

The bathrub offers hopeful dreams for something amazing! It will take a bit of work and is a “lovely” 70s mustard yellow in color currently but I have big dream for it. Stay tuned for its makeover, not many Tiny Houses on wheels have a tub but for us its a must!

Dreaming into Reality!
~Angie

Here we go!

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Wow! A tangible step is here! Something physical to hold onto. A dream in the making is becoming reality.

This old Shasta camper from 1975 had many good years and gave a family or two some great memories. It fulfilled dreams for them. It had a great “life”.

But now its old. Worn out. Has water damage and the termites have enjoyed the back corner.

Perfect!

What better an option to be “reborn” into a new memory maker? A new dream fulfiller! An inspiration for what can be will a bit of hard work and ingenuity!

Follow along and enjoy the process with us! We cant wait to get started!!!

Dreaming into Reality!
~Angie